Book Review: The Weather Detective by Peter Wohlleben

I like to think I inherited my love of gardening from my grandmother, who had the most beautiful vegetable garden. I always loved talking with her about our gardens, and whenever I would visit she always had a clipping of a plant or fresh vegetables for me to take home.

It is around this time each year that I start thinking and planning for my garden. The days are getting lighter and brighter each day, and I am all but over the cold weather and snow. I enjoy getting out in my garden so much. I like watching how things change from year to year and reviewing my journals from years past to how various seeds and plants I’ve tried, have worked out. The fun thing about gardening is that there is always some element of surprise…both good and bad. I recently read The Weather Detective, and this book is a must-read for any gardener, no matter your level of expertise.

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It’s about Community: Meteorologist Janice Huff

I was honored to have an opportunity recently to speak with Janice Huff, chief meteorologist for NBC4 New York. Janice graduated from Florida State University with her bachelor’s degree in meteorology, and from there entered a career in broadcast meteorology. She has been with NBC New York for more than 25 years, and was inducted as a Fellow of the American Meteorological Society in 2020.
While an impressive career and honors by peers and colleagues certainly sets Janice apart, what really drew me to her was her passion- passion for science, passion for her community, and passion for reaching the next generation of scientists.

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It’s a bird, it’s a plane, it’s a…snowflake?

In this day and age, it seems as though there are statistics, records, and rankings for everything. Top ten most expensive plants? Check. Ten most poisonous animals in the world? There’s a list for that (hint: be very careful swimming in the ocean waters of northern Australia). Here is another record which you may not be aware of: on this date (January 28) in 1887, the world’s largest snowflake is said to have fallen on the Fort Keogh Army Post in Montana. How did this record-breaking event come to be recorded, and why has the record not been broken? Let’s take a closer look.

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Looking forward to 2021: Goals and Plans

I don’t know about you, but I always take some time to look backward and forward at the end of a calendar year. It is always interesting to see the twists and turns that happened during the previous year, and to take those lessons learned and apply them to the next year. After last week’s post which reflected back on 2020, I thought it would be neat to share how I take all of that and look forward into 2021.

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2020: Reflections on a year like no other

Thursday, December 31, 2020.

We have posted our weekly blog nearly every Thursday for the last two years.

This Thursday post feels different in so many ways. While I often take time to reflect at the end of a calendar year, this one has stopped me in my tracks. I cannot help but look back on this year and think how absolutely different it ended up turning out than what I had hoped or planned. Like countless other people, Kelly and I both have experienced direct impacts of COVID-19, ranging from minor disappointments to shattering losses. It has been a year of grief but also a year of growth. I think in terms of key words and key points and that has been so helpful as I think through all of the personal and professional upheaval which this year as brought. Here are the words that have come to my mind:

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Encouraging Girls in STEM: The Ella Project

If you follow us on Facebook, you might have noticed that we shared a post back in October about the Ella Project. I was so pleased to make the aquaintence of Anthony Onesto, co-founder and creator of the Ella Project, and honored to be profiled as one of their Stories of women who work in STEM fields. This organization is doing great things, and so I decided to use this week’s blog to tell you about it in more detail!

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Third Thursday Interview: Rick Shema, CCM

For this week’s Third Thursday interview, I am so excited for you to meet a colleague of mine, Rick Shema. I met Rick while we were both serving terms on the American Meteorological Society Board of Certified Consulting Meteorologists (BCCM). Rick owns Weatherguy.com, a company which specializes in marine meteorology. He provides forecasts and support services for marine applications, and also provides expert testimony for marine cases in litigation. His love of the water and Naval experience give him top notch credentials in his work. We’ve had the opportunity to collaborate together both on the BCCM and on a case or two over the years, and I always enjoy working with him. His passion, integrity, and enthusiasm for what he does comes through in every aspect of his work. I hope you enjoy getting to know Rick as much as I have!

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Celebrating The Weather Blog’s 100th (Post)!

It is amazing to believe, but here we are: this week’s post marks the 100th time that Kelly and I have been fortunate enough to connect with our readers! I have to admit, I was filled with some trepidation as we began this journey not quite two years ago, wondering what on earth we might write about when we committed to blogging weekly. Worse yet, who would want to read it? To my surprise and delight, writers block has been a rare occurrence, and we enjoy and read all of the comments from our readers. I thought it would be fun to go back into the archives and reflect on how this space has grown and evolved since we posted our first entry back in December of 2018.

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Weather Safety and Preparedness for Kids

After Kelly’s great blog about mental health and tropical cyclones, I thought it would be great to piggy back off this idea and discuss how to deal with anxiety and worries which kids may have about hazardous weather. Extreme, or even just abnormal, weather can be a cause of anxiety in kids of all ages. Children are often fearful of the unknown, and having questions about weather phenomena, particularly those which seem scary due to seeing footage on television or hearing parents talk, can be particularly unnerving. As Kelly discussed in our ‘Ask Me Anything: Weather Edition‘ event which we held a few months ago, we firmly believe that talking to children at an age-appropriate level about weather and teaching them how to prepare and be safe during hazardous weather can go a long way toward helping reassure children and ease some of that ‘fear of the unknown’. Let’s dig a little deeper and talk about some ways that parents, teachers, and other authority figures can help empower children to be less fearful and more prepared.

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