Merry Christmas from our family to yours!

We at Shade Tree Meteorology are taking some time this week to enjoy some family time and spend the holidays with our loved ones, and we hope you are able to do the same. As we look back on 2019, we have seen some big changes happen, both professionally and personally. We have thoroughly enjoyed writing this blog for you each week and we hope you enjoy this look back at our favorite blog posts of 2019!

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NOAA Climate Analyses and Statistics

Did you know that NOAA regularly publishes articles that summarize recent weather events and the state of the climate ( https://www.noaa.gov/topic-tags/climate-analyses-and-statistics )? Generally, articles are released about twice or three times a month, and contain information about significant weather events, climate statistics for the United States for the previous month, and notes about significant studies or papers which have been published about the state of the climate. See below for details about some recent articles!

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The 20th Northeast Regional Operational Workshop (NROW XX): How scientific research translates into better forecasts

This past week, I attended the Northeast Regional Operational Workshop, held here in Albany, New York. This conference is a local meeting, organized by forecasters at the National Weather Service in Albany, New York, which had its genesis 20 years ago as a means for forecasters at the NWS, researchers and academics at the University at Albany, and others to share results of research projects which relate directly to forecast operations in the National Weather Service. Today, the conference is attended by forecasters from many National Weather Service offices, students and faculty from the University at Albany, local media meteorologists, and representatives from the private sector such as myself.

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Daylight Savings Time: Why do we have it, and should we keep it?

If you live in a state which implements Daylight Savings Time between March and early November, you are no doubt looking forward to sleeping in one extra hour this coming Sunday morning (unless you have small children, whose body clocks do not care whether the world is in standard or daylight time!!!). There is much discussion every six months, especially in the spring when we lose an hour of sleep, about why we even have Daylight Savings Time, whether we should get rid of it, or even just keep it in Daylight time all the year long. Let’s look at the history of Daylight Savings Time, as well as some little known facts and trivia:

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Trick or Treat: Halloween Weather around the Nation

Here in upstate New York it is a blustery fall day. The peak foliage and sunny days we have been enjoying came to an abrupt end yesterday as heavy rainfall and strong winds resulted in many trees dropping their leaves (time to do some raking!!). Suddenly it feels like mid- to late-fall, and many children are busy thinking about what they will be for Halloween. We thought it might be fun to take a look around the country to see what the trick-or-treaters can sometimes face in their quest for candy around the neighborhoods.

Peebles Island State Park, October 14, 2019.
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Wild Early Fall Weather

The autumnal equinox was just over a week ago, and already it seems as though winter is knocking at the door in some parts of the country. Meanwhile, other parts of the United States are enduring record-breaking heat. Let’s take a look at some of the recent headline-making weather events around the nation.

Glacier National Park after an early season snowstorm, September 2019. Courtesy NPS.
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Fall Weather Safety

At the time of this writing, I am enjoying a beautiful train ride along the Hudson River between New York City and Albany. Although the sun is shining and temperatures are in the 70s, some early hints of fall color are showing up on the Catskills to the west. Fall typically is not a time when most of us have ‘hazardous weather’ on our minds, especially here in the northeast U.S. where fall can be one of the most idyllic times of year. However, weather hazards can present themselves in any season, and fall is no exception.

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What is NOAA, and what is its mission?

Many of us turn to the National Weather Service for weather warnings and forecasts, but did you know that the National Weather Service is only one part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, or NOAA? Our tax dollars help to fund this agency, which is part of the U.S. Department of Commerce, so let’s look deeper at the mission of this very important organization and its offices.

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Hurricane Dorian: A study in hurricane impacts

At the time of this writing on Tuesday, September 2, Hurricane Dorian is currently bringing heavy rain, winds and storm surge to the Bahamas as it makes its slow trek towards the eastern U.S. coastline. This storm has proven to be very difficult to forecast, in part because of its rapid intensification and slow speed. Let’s look back and see how this dangerous situation evolved and where the forecast impacts are expected in the next 3-5 days.

Satellite imagery of Hurricane Dorian over the Bahamas, September 1, 2019.
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